FFRP Issues

Floridians for Responsible Policy Opposes

the Employee Free Choice Act

BACKGROUND:

The Democratic Party has a proud legacy of defending many of the most fundamental values of our American democracy. Their principled and ardent defense of civil rights, voting rights, equal protection, privacy and workplace fairness has been a traditional cornerstone of the party and has helped make the country the envy of the world. Through social unrest, economic downturns, foreign conflicts and other challenges, the Democratic Party has time and again risen to the challenge of fighting for these values even when it wasn’t politically popular.

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Floridians for Responsible Policy Opposes

Plan to Fast-Track Off Shore Drilling

BACKGROUND:

As our planet’s natural energy resources become increasingly scarce, the United States faces extreme competition from other established and developing countries for those precious resources.  As the nation struggles to coalesce around a comprehensive strategy, governments and private interests are increasingly pursuing more parochial solutions to their immediate energy needs and as such, are gradually complicating the ability of our country to pursue a coordinated energy policy. The country faces serious decisions going forward whether to pursue nuclear energy, expand drilling for petroleum products, exploring wind and solar technologies and of course, serious energy conservation measures.

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Floridians for Responsible Policy Opposes

Amendment 4 – “Hometown Democracy”

BACKGROUND:

The proposed “Amendment 4” to Florida’s constitution would require a public referendum on any amendment to a local government’s Comprehensive Plan. Amendment 4 was drafted by a group of activists under the banner “Hometown Democracy” with the stated goal of “giving voters veto power over changes to a local community’s master plan for growth.”

Florida’s Growth Management Act of 1985 required every local government to adopt a Comprehensive Plan to serve as its framework for managing growth and making land use decisions. Comprehensive Plans are regularly amended to accommodate new and expanded businesses, protect environmentally sensitive lands, establish public parks, address state and federal requirements, and to implement public improvements such as commuter and high speed rail.

Amending a Comprehensive Plan requires multiple public hearings, review by the Florida Department of Community Affairs (“DCA”), and adoption by local government. Amendments require balancing a variety of interest – most importantly the public interest – by analyzing complex, interrelated issues involving urban planning, the environment, traffic, utilities, schools, public facilities, economic development, and the law.

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